Asker Portrait
Anonymous asked:What are your thoughts on body piercings? I know the bible teaches that the body is our temple, but bodies, just as temples, can be decorated. I know some consider piercings in general to be mutilation, but I think that is a bit of an exaggeration. To be specific, I was thinking of getting my nipple pierced because after years of self-deprecation, I am finally in a place where I feel comfortable with my body and I'd like to commemorate that. Thoughts?

This is one of those questions that comes up all the time among Christians of any age. Especially as teens, we find ourselves trying to express personalities and our originality by getting a tattoo or a piercing or dying our hair bright blue, but our parents say, “No way.” What’s the reason? And what are we supposed to do?

Your parents probably have their own explanation as to why they do or do not believe that altering appearances is okay. You’ll have to ask them for those reasons. We can address what the Bible says here. But first, we want to make sure you are aware of this: your parents have the final say on this issue, no matter what you read here. If you are living under their roof and their care, you must respect their decisions (Ephesians 6:1). What you do when you’re an adult and moved out is between you and God.

Old Testament Laws

There are verses in the Old Testament that include laws for the Israelites to follow in order to show that they were separate from the rest of the world. Verses like Leviticus 19:28, “Do not cut your bodies for the dead or put tattoo marks on yourselves. I am the LORD.”

At that time in history, some religious cults would perform various practices (see Leviticus 19:26-27), including making marks on their skin to honor the dead or show faithfulness to their gods. Obviously, God did not want the Israelites to ever be mistaken for those groups because of something they did. That’s totally legit.

Saved by grace, not by law

Believers today are no longer required to follow Old Testament laws (Romans 10:4; Galatians 3:23-25; Ephesians 2:15). We are saved by grace through Christ’s sacrifice for our sin, not by following rules (Romans 6:14). However, even though the Bible does not specifically talk about tattoos and Christians today, there are a few other factors we need to consider first.

First Corinthians 10:31 says, “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God.” Will your tattoo or body piercing glorify God or go against Him? What is your motivation for wanting to get one done (2 Corinthians 13:5)? Is your heart in a place of godly peace or rebellion (Proverbs 30:17)? Is the question of whether or not to do it causing bad things to happen in your life (1 Thessalonians 5:22)?

If getting a tattoo or piercing or dying your hair is going to cause problems or hinder your ability to be more like Christ, then you should seriously re-consider that decision. This is a matter between you and God. Ask Him if it would be a good choice for you and how He can use it in your life.

Try not to make it harder for everybody else.

There is a lesson in Romans 14 about how we should not do anything that would cause another believer to stumble. The story goes that Christian Group A did not want to eat meat that was sacrificed to idols, but Christian Group B thought, “What’s the big deal? I don’t believe in that god, and I am not letting a good steak go to waste.” The author says that Christian Group B should not eat that sacrificed meat in front of Christian Group A because, to them, that meat was sinful to eat.

If your friend isn’t supposed to watch horror movies, don’t invite him over to watch Ninja Axe Murderer Massacre. That would be a temptation to go against his parents’ wishes. If a friend’s parents have explicitly said that she cannot dye her hair whatsoever, but your parents are like, “Sure, why not?” you should still consider your poor friend. Will she become jealous of you? Is she going to be resentful toward her parents? Basically, will your actions directly cause her to sin?

"For the kingdom of God is not a matter of eating and drinking but of righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit. Whoever thus serves Christ is acceptable to God and approved by men. So then let us pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding." (Romans 14:17-19)

The question final question is this: “Will doing __________________ create peace and encouragement or will it cause problems for me and those around me?”

Your body isn’t yours.

If you are a believer in Christ, your body and soul have been cleaned up and made all shiny and new by Jesus’s sacrifice. Because this redemption was a gift from God, you belong to Him now. (Don’t worry, it’s not as scary as it sounds; God loves us more than we love ourselves and only wants the best for us. He’ll take care of you.)

As we said before, when you are an adult living away from home, this will become a matter between you and God. Ask Him if it would be a good choice for you and how He can use it in your life. If your body belongs to Him (1 Corinthians 6:19-20), you should make this decision together.  I would take this to the Lord in prayer.  God bless you!!! :):):)

Asker Portrait
Anonymous asked:STOP BRAINWASHING PEOPLE! if they want a tattoo or piercing they can have one. who are you to tell people what to do with their bodys?!

I am not brainwashing anyone.  There are verses in the Old Testament that include laws for the Israelites to follow in order to show that they were separate from the rest of the world. Verses like Leviticus 19:28, “Do not cut your bodies for the dead or put tattoo marks on yourselves. I am the LORD.”

At that time in history, some religious cults would perform various practices (see Leviticus 19:26-27), including making marks on their skin to honor the dead or show faithfulness to their gods. Obviously, God did not want the Israelites to ever be mistaken for those groups because of something they did. That’s totally legit.

Saved by grace, not by law

Believers today are no longer required to follow Old Testament laws (Romans 10:4; Galatians 3:23-25; Ephesians 2:15). We are saved by grace through Christ’s sacrifice for our sin, not by following rules (Romans 6:14). However, even though the Bible does not specifically talk about tattoos and Christians today, there are a few other factors we need to consider first.

First Corinthians 10:31 says, “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God.” Will your tattoo or body piercing glorify God or go against Him? What is your motivation for wanting to get one done (2 Corinthians 13:5)? Is your heart in a place of godly peace or rebellion (Proverbs 30:17)? Is the question of whether or not to do it causing bad things to happen in your life (1 Thessalonians 5:22)?

If getting a tattoo or piercing or dying your hair is going to cause problems or hinder your ability to be more like Christ, then you should seriously re-consider that decision. This is a matter between you and God. Ask Him if it would be a good choice for you and how He can use it in your life.

Try not to make it harder for everybody else.

There is a lesson in Romans 14 about how we should not do anything that would cause another believer to stumble. The story goes that Christian Group A did not want to eat meat that was sacrificed to idols, but Christian Group B thought, “What’s the big deal? I don’t believe in that god, and I am not letting a good steak go to waste.” The author says that Christian Group B should not eat that sacrificed meat in front of Christian Group A because, to them, that meat was sinful to eat.

If your friend isn’t supposed to watch horror movies, don’t invite him over to watch Ninja Axe Murderer Massacre. That would be a temptation to go against his parents’ wishes. If a friend’s parents have explicitly said that she cannot dye her hair whatsoever, but your parents are like, “Sure, why not?” you should still consider your poor friend. Will she become jealous of you? Is she going to be resentful toward her parents? Basically, will your actions directly cause her to sin?

"For the kingdom of God is not a matter of eating and drinking but of righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit. Whoever thus serves Christ is acceptable to God and approved by men. So then let us pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding." (Romans 14:17-19)

The question final question is this: “Will doing __________________ create peace and encouragement or will it cause problems for me and those around me?”

Your body isn’t yours.

If you are a believer in Christ, your body and soul have been cleaned up and made all shiny and new by Jesus’s sacrifice. Because this redemption was a gift from God, you belong to Him now. (Don’t worry, it’s not as scary as it sounds; God loves us more than we love ourselves and only wants the best for us. He’ll take care of you.)

As we said before, when you are an adult living away from home, this will become a matter between you and God. Ask Him if it would be a good choice for you and how He can use it in your life. If your body belongs to Him (1 Corinthians 6:19-20), you should make this decision together.  God bless you!!! :):):):)

The Dangerous Art of the Tattoo and Henna

Consider the health risks of this invasive procedure before getting—or removing—body art

By BERNADINE HEALY, M.D.

Tattoos are fast becoming a mark of the 21st century, with one quarter or more of those under the age of 30 adorning their skin with at least one. Whether driven by the urge for personal expression or just plain youthful impulsiveness, most people get tattooed without a clue about the health implications of this invasive skin-puncturing procedure. I’d suggest that all tattooing require a signed consent form outlining risks—the most obvious one being a major case of remorse.

[If You’re Considering a Tattoo, Read This]

Upwards of 50 percent of those who get tattoos later wish they hadn’t. Their regrets become medical when they visit a dermatologist to have the tattoos removed, which is both painful and expensive. In the July issue of the Archives of Dermatology, researchers at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center report on what’s behind the change of heart: moving on from the past, problems wearing clothes, embarrassment, and concerns that tattoos could adversely affect job or career.

[Black Henna Tattoo Chemical Can Cause Skin Reaction]

But tattooing is designed to last forever, delivering permanent ink deep under the epidermis. The skin reacts by protectively encapsulating the alien clumps of pigment in dense fibrous tissue while a few nearby lymph nodes collect what migrates out. For a long time, removal meant surgical excision or deep abrasion of the skin, invariably causing scarring and sometimes the need for skin grafting. In the preferred approach now, the tattoo gradually fades away under many months of laser treatments tailored to the wavelength of the pigments. Sounds easy. But with disruption, the fading tattoo becomes more like a toxic chemical dump.

Chemists from several laboratories, including the government’s National Center for Toxicological Research, have identified low levels of carcinogens in tattoo ink. But the laser removal process, which demolishes the pigment by scorching it with heat, triggers chemical reactions that generate carcinogenic and mutation-inducing breakdown products, which are then absorbed by the body. Recently, German scientists reported that concentrations of toxic molecules from red and yellow pigments increased up to 70-fold after laser irradiation. And the bigger the tattoo, the greater the toxic release. This can only make one wonder whether it’s better to let the sleeping paint lie, walled off by the body’s own protective devices. Only time and a lot more study will tell.

We know so woefully little about tattoos. The Food and Drug Administration, which goes after cosmetics with a vengeance, does not regulate the tattoo industry. In fact, no one really knows exactly what’s in the numerous commercial and homemade inks. But they do contain solvents and metals like lead and mercury and a range of impurities acceptable for computer printers or car paint—but not for human injection.

Allergic reactions and skin infections can occur after tattooing. And though they may be coincidental, skin cancers, including melanomas, have been reported within tattoo sites, bearing very close watching. The FDA warns about the risk of tattoo parlors transmitting viruses like HIV and the cancer-causing hepatitis C. Because of this, blood banks typically ban donations from people who have been tattooed in the previous 12 months. The FDA also warns patients that if they have an MRI scan, their tattoos can swell or burn, presumably related to the metal in some inks.

Stigma. Once mainly a guy thing, tattoos now decorate men and women equally, and increasingly they are a women’s health issue. It should be obvious that getting or removing tattoos during pregnancy is not a good idea. And some anesthesiologists have expressed concerns about performing epidurals, used during labor, through those symmetrically designed female lower-back tattoos because of the slim possibility that the needle might carry pigment into the spinal canal. Perhaps not surprisingly, most patients seeking removal are women, prompted by a disproportionate level of psychological distress and even tattoo stigma. Witness the tasteless moniker used to describe those lower-back tattoos: “tramp stamp.”


Vegetable Henna

Vegetable henna is considered generally safe, though contact allergies may occur depending upon your child’s sensitivity. Note the color of the ink before you allow your child to try a temporary tattoo. Pure vegetable henna is brown or reddish brown. If it is any other color including blue or black, the mix contains additives that may be harmful to the skin. Ask the tattoo artist for the ingredients of their brand of henna before letting your child get a tribal armband.

Black Henna

Black henna usually contains p-phenylenediamine, or PPD, which is approved by the FDA only for hair dyes. The FDA explicitly forbids the use of PPD in cosmetics, including temporary tattoo dye marketed as “Black Henna.” PPD can cause skin irritations ranging from redness to swelling in mild cases. More severe reactions can lead to altered skin pigmentation and permanent scarring. The PPD in hair dye is already controversial as there is a tested but tenuous link to various cancers. The color additive is aggressively mutagenic according to Ames testing, meaning it is a possible carcinogen that can cause DNA damage.

Applicators

Some temporary tattoo artists use microinjection machines that inject ink, usually henna-based, into the surface layers of the skin using a tiny needle. Unlike deeply injected permanent tattoos, the temporary surface injections fade in a few weeks. The process doesn’t hurt, but it does puncture the skin which led the U.K.’s Health and Safety Executive to issue a warning that improperly cleaned machines could lead to the spread of infectious diseases including HIV and hepatitis. The U.K. study led to the banning of several types of machines with internal parts that could carry contamination from one customer to another.




Asker Portrait
Anonymous asked:so as a Christian, is it wrong to have your ears pierced?

There were men and women in the Bible who wore earrings (Exodus 32:2-3; Numbers 31:50; Judges 8:24; Song of Solomon 1:10-11). The Bible nowhere condemns an earring or earrings in women or men. Some people wonder why earrings are for the most part accepted, but other body piercings are considered questionable at best. This is a good point. The whole issue of piercings is not one of “Does the Bible forbid this?” but rather “Is this something I should do?”

While there is no specific counsel in the Bible about earrings, Paul had general things to say about jewelry when he advised Timothy on worship within the local church: “I also want women to dress modestly, with decency and propriety, not with braided hair or gold or pearls or expensive clothes, but with good deeds, appropriate for women who profess to worship God” (1 Timothy 2:9-10). The principle here applies both in and out of church: modesty, decency, propriety and good deeds are the hallmarks of a true Christian in both men and women.

Whether we choose to wear earrings or any other piece of jewelry is a matter of personal conscience. In any case, clearly our responsibility as Christians is to bring honor and glory to the God we profess to love, doing nothing out of vain conceit (Philippians 2:3) and remembering that “man looks at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart” (1 Samuel 16:7).  God bless you!!! :):)

Asker Portrait
detroitmel asked:I've heard different opinions on tattooing, I've had people give scriptures for and against. What do you think?

The Old Testament law commanded the Israelites, “Do not cut your bodies for the dead or put tattoo marks on yourselves. I am the LORD” (Leviticus 19:28). So, even though believers today are not under the Old Testament law (Romans 10:4; Galatians 3:23-25; Ephesians 2:15), the fact that there was a command against tattoos should raise some questions. The New Testament does not say anything about whether or not a believer should get a tattoo.

In relation to tattoos and body piercings, a good test is to determine whether we can honestly, in good conscience, ask God to bless and use that particular activity for His own good purposes. “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God” (1 Corinthians 10:31). The New Testament does not command against tattoos or body piercings, but it also does not give us any reason to believe God would have us get tattoos or body piercings.

An important scriptural principle on issues the Bible does not specifically address is if there is room for doubt whether it pleases God, then it is best not to engage in that activity. Romans 14:23 reminds us that anything that does not come from faith is sin. We need to remember that our bodies, as well as our souls, have been redeemed and belong to God. Although 1 Corinthians 6:19-20 does not directly apply to tattoos or body piercings, it does give us a principle: “Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body.” This great truth should have a real bearing on what we do and where we go with our bodies. If our bodies belong to God, we should make sure we have His clear “permission” before we “mark them up” with tattoos or body piercings. 

God bless you!!! :):)

Asker Portrait
itstammyyo-deactivated20120420 asked:Hello! :)i was wondering if i can get your opinion about a tattoo of a cross intertwined with a Jesus fish on the back of my neck. i honestly believe that it would glorify God and people will get curious on what it means when they see it and i would be able to share Jesus to them! that is my plan, but nonetheless! i will fast and ask God about it because i'm here to do His will, not mine.i want to be open to others opinions :) i know the Jesus fish means "Jesus Christ, Son of God, our Savior" :)

Obviously, a tattoo of a cross is “better” than a tattoo of a flaming skull, naked woman, or demon. Having a tattoo saying “Jesus saves” could indeed be a conversation starter with some people who would never approach a preacher wearing a suit and tie. Some refer to Revelation 19:16 as an example of Jesus possibly having a tattoo on His thigh, “King of kings and Lord of lords.” The question is not necessarily “is getting a tattoo a sin?” The question is more “is getting a tattoo a good and necessary thing to do?” First Corinthians 10:23 declares, “Everything is permissible – but not everything is beneficial. Everything is permissible – but not everything is constructive.” Christian tattoos may be “permissible,” but are they beneficial and constructive?

In 1 Corinthians 9:22-23, Paul exclaims, “I have become all things to all men so that by all possible means I might save some. I do all this for the sake of the gospel.” Becoming all things to save some is perhaps the only good possible reason for getting a Christian tattoo. If having a tattoo genuinely opens doors for evangelism that would otherwise be closed, getting Christian tattoos would likely “qualify” under Paul’s “becoming all things” qualification. At the same time, it is frankly difficult to envision a scenario in which having a tattoo would enable a greater possibility of evangelism. If a person will not listen to you due to a lack of a tattoo, it is highly unlikely that such a person would genuinely listen due to the presence of a tattoo.

With that said, the biblically based conclusion would seem to be that Christian tattoos are permissible, but it is highly questionable whether they can be considered beneficial and constructive. A Christian considering getting a tattoo should pray for wisdom (James 1:5) and ask the Lord to provide pure motives and discernment.  god bless you! :):)

Asker Portrait
Anonymous asked:I wish to get a tattoo of a bible verse on my shoulder blade and my grandmother's name on my collarbone, is that bad?

The Old Testament law commanded the Israelites, “Do not cut your bodies for the dead or put tattoo marks on yourselves. I am the LORD” (Leviticus 19:28). So, even though believers today are not under the Old Testament law (Romans 10:4Galatians 3:23-25Ephesians 2:15), the fact that there was a command against tattoos should raise some questions. The New Testament does not say anything about whether or not a believer should get a tattoo.

In relation to tattoos and body piercings, a good test is to determine whether we can honestly, in good conscience, ask God to bless and use that particular activity for His own good purposes. “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God” (1 Corinthians 10:31). The New Testament does not command against tattoos or body piercings, but it also does not give us any reason to believe God would have us get tattoos or body piercings.

An important scriptural principle on issues the Bible does not specifically address is if there is room for doubt whether it pleases God, then it is best not to engage in that activity. Romans 14:23 reminds us that anything that does not come from faith is sin. We need to remember that our bodies, as well as our souls, have been redeemed and belong to God. Although 1 Corinthians 6:19-20 does not directly apply to tattoos or body piercings, it does give us a principle: “Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body.” This great truth should have a real bearing on what we do and where we go with our bodies. If our bodies belong to God, we should make sure we have His clear “permission” before we “mark them up” with tattoos or body piercings.  God bless you! <3

Asker Portrait
Anonymous asked:Hi. Im a Christian. I just wonder, is it bad to get a tattoo? Not the permanent one, just henna or something. Btw, Im 16. Thanks!

The Old Testament law commanded the Israelites, “Do not cut your bodies for the dead or put tattoo marks on yourselves. I am the LORD” (Leviticus 19:28). So, even though believers today are not under the Old Testament law (Romans 10:4Galatians 3:23-25Ephesians 2:15), the fact that there was a command against tattoos should raise some questions. The New Testament does not say anything about whether or not a believer should get a tattoo.

In relation to tattoos and body piercings, a good test is to determine whether we can honestly, in good conscience, ask God to bless and use that particular activity for His own good purposes. “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God” (1 Corinthians 10:31). The New Testament does not command against tattoos or body piercings, but it also does not give us any reason to believe God would have us get tattoos or body piercings.

An important scriptural principle on issues the Bible does not specifically address is if there is room for doubt whether it pleases God, then it is best not to engage in that activity. Romans 14:23 reminds us that anything that does not come from faith is sin. We need to remember that our bodies, as well as our souls, have been redeemed and belong to God. Although 1 Corinthians 6:19-20 does not directly apply to tattoos or body piercings, it does give us a principle: “Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body.” This great truth should have a real bearing on what we do and where we go with our bodies. If our bodies belong to God, we should make sure we have His clear “permission” before we “mark them up” with tattoos or body piercings.  God bless you! <3

Asker Portrait
Anonymous asked:What does the bible say about tattoos? I want one really bad.

The Old Testament law commanded the Israelites, “Do not cut your bodies for the dead or put tattoo marks on yourselves. I am the LORD” (Leviticus 19:28). So, even though believers today are not under the Old Testament law (Romans 10:4Galatians 3:23-25Ephesians 2:15), the fact that there was a command against tattoos should raise some questions. The New Testament does not say anything about whether or not a believer should get a tattoo.

In relation to tattoos and body piercings, a good test is to determine whether we can honestly, in good conscience, ask God to bless and use that particular activity for His own good purposes. “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God” (1 Corinthians 10:31). The New Testament does not command against tattoos or body piercings, but it also does not give us any reason to believe God would have us get tattoos or body piercings.

An important scriptural principle on issues the Bible does not specifically address is if there is room for doubt whether it pleases God, then it is best not to engage in that activity. Romans 14:23 reminds us that anything that does not come from faith is sin. We need to remember that our bodies, as well as our souls, have been redeemed and belong to God. Although 1 Corinthians 6:19-20 does not directly apply to tattoos or body piercings, it does give us a principle: “Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body.” This great truth should have a real bearing on what we do and where we go with our bodies. If our bodies belong to God, we should make sure we have His clear “permission” before we “mark them up” with tattoos or body piercings.  God bless you! :)

Asker Portrait
daddyneverletsgo asked:Dear mum,

I heard that we're not suppose to write anything onto our hands or any body. My mum and sisters said it wasn't right. But I don't get it. I mean I couldn't find it in the Bible. Can you help explain it to me please.

The Old Testament law commanded the Israelites, “Do not cut your bodies for the dead or put tattoo marks on yourselves. I am the LORD” (Leviticus 19:28). So, even though believers today are not under the Old Testament law (Romans 10:4Galatians 3:23-25Ephesians 2:15), the fact that there was a command against tattoos should raise some questions. The New Testament does not say anything about whether or not a believer should get a tattoo.

In relation to tattoos and body piercings, a good test is to determine whether we can honestly, in good conscience, ask God to bless and use that particular activity for His own good purposes. “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God” (1 Corinthians 10:31). The New Testament does not command against tattoos or body piercings, but it also does not give us any reason to believe God would have us get tattoos or body piercings.

An important scriptural principle on issues the Bible does not specifically address is if there is room for doubt whether it pleases God, then it is best not to engage in that activity. Romans 14:23 reminds us that anything that does not come from faith is sin. We need to remember that our bodies, as well as our souls, have been redeemed and belong to God. Although 1 Corinthians 6:19-20 does not directly apply to tattoos or body piercings, it does give us a principle: “Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body.” This great truth should have a real bearing on what we do and where we go with our bodies. If our bodies belong to God, we should make sure we have His clear “permission” before we “mark them up” with tattoos or body piercings.  I hope this helps.  God bless you!  

Asker Portrait
lostandfound26 asked:Hello! good morning! I just want to ask about this. What does the bible say about tattoos? Is it bad to have tattoo for Christians?

The Old Testament law commanded the Israelites, “Do not cut your bodies for the dead or put tattoo marks on yourselves. I am the LORD” (Leviticus 19:28). So, even though believers today are not under the Old Testament law (Romans 10:4Galatians 3:23-25Ephesians 2:15), the fact that there was a command against tattoos should raise some questions. The New Testament does not say anything about whether or not a believer should get a tattoo.

In relation to tattoos and body piercings, a good test is to determine whether we can honestly, in good conscience, ask God to bless and use that particular activity for His own good purposes. “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God” (1 Corinthians 10:31). The New Testament does not command against tattoos or body piercings, but it also does not give us any reason to believe God would have us get tattoos or body piercings.

An important scriptural principle on issues the Bible does not specifically address is if there is room for doubt whether it pleases God, then it is best not to engage in that activity. Romans 14:23 reminds us that anything that does not come from faith is sin. We need to remember that our bodies, as well as our souls, have been redeemed and belong to God. Although 1 Corinthians 6:19-20 does not directly apply to tattoos or body piercings, it does give us a principle: “Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body.” This great truth should have a real bearing on what we do and where we go with our bodies. If our bodies belong to God, we should make sure we have His clear “permission” before we “mark them up” with tattoos or body piercings. 
Obviously, a tattoo of a cross is “better” than a tattoo of a flaming skull, naked woman, or demon. Having a tattoo saying “Jesus saves” could indeed be a conversation starter with some people who would never approach a preacher wearing a suit and tie. Some refer to Revelation 19:16 as an example of Jesus possibly having a tattoo on His thigh, “King of kings and Lord of lords.” The question is not necessarily “is getting a tattoo a sin?” The question is more “is getting a tattoo a good and necessary thing to do?” First Corinthians 10:23 declares, “Everything is permissible – but not everything is beneficial. Everything is permissible – but not everything is constructive.” Christian tattoos may be “permissible,” but are they beneficial and constructive?

In 1 Corinthians 9:22-23, Paul exclaims, “I have become all things to all men so that by all possible means I might save some. I do all this for the sake of the gospel.” Becoming all things to save some is perhaps the only good possible reason for getting a Christian tattoo. If having a tattoo genuinely opens doors for evangelism that would otherwise be closed, getting Christian tattoos would likely “qualify” under Paul’s “becoming all things” qualification. At the same time, it is frankly difficult to envision a scenario in which having a tattoo would enable a greater possibility of evangelism. If a person will not listen to you due to a lack of a tattoo, it is highly unlikely that such a person would genuinely listen due to the presence of a tattoo.

With that said, the biblically based conclusion would seem to be that Christian tattoos are permissible, but it is highly questionable whether they can be considered beneficial and constructive. A Christian considering getting a tattoo should pray for wisdom (James 1:5) and ask the Lord to provide pure motives and discernment.  I hope this helps you.  God bless you!  :)

 





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